All posts tagged: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie

Top 5 Tuesday

Because Inge over at The Belgian Reviewer suggested it, I’ve been thinking about book covers and their impact. And more specifically, the one’s that I, personally, love. Certainly, there have been many over the years but, for this Top 5 post, I’m sticking to covers from the last few years rather than the last few decades. #1. THE CITY OF BRASS by S. A. Chakraborty #2. DESCENDANT OF THE CRANE by Joan He as illustrated by Feifei Ruan #3. THE COLOUR OF MAGIC by Terry Pratchett as illustrated by Josh Kirby #4. EARTHSEA by Ursula La Guin as illustrated by Charles Vess #5. The FLAVIA DE LUCE series by Alan Bradley as illustrated by Joe Montgogomery — And yes, I’m nominating the entire 10-book series for their bright colours, fun depictions, and consistent continuity of dark humour. What’s important to note about all these covers—bar the Flavia de Luce series—is they are all fantasy titles. Which begs the question, what’s wrong with all the other genres that they don’t put the same kind of effort …

Top 10 Books of 2018

Oh dear, given the small number of books I read AND finished this year. I have a very small selection of novels to choose my Top 10 from, especially given half of the books I started to read ended up as DNF. This list could have easily ended up as My Top 5 Books of 2018. But I digress. Looking at the score I gave all the books I did finish and, in reverse order—10 through to 1—with 1 being my favourite book of 2018, here’s what I came up with: #10 A MAN CALLED OVE by Fredrik Backman (8) #9 THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE by Alan Bradley (8.5) #8 A GREAT RECKONING by Louise Penny (8.5) #7 THE DEFENCE by Steve Cavanagh (8.5) #6 DEEP BLUE TROUBLE by Steph Broadribb (8.5) #5 THE BLOODPRINT by Ausma Zehanat Khan (9) #4 THE MISSING INFORMANT by Anders de la Motte (9) #3 FORCE OF NATURE & THE DRY by Jane Hunter (9.5) #2 THE LOCKSMITH’S DAUGHTER by Karen Brooks (9.5) #1 THE …

Fall Book Tag — 2018

Shanah over at Bionic Book Worm, has created a Fall Book Tag, which is basically a tag we can all do for the fun of it, especially as it’s just once a year. So here are my entries for the Fall Book Tag. Crisp Fall Air — A book that felt fresh and new: For me, this has to be The Sweetness At The Bottom Of The Pie by Alan Bradley, it’s not normally the kind of book I would pick up, let alone read. But I was delighted I took the plunge. Because, for me at least, this was a laugh out loud read, with so many quirky moments that gave me flashbacks to my own childhood. I finished reading this one with a huge smile on my face. I love Flavia and her crazy family, and want more of the ‘pie’. Howling Winds — An ending that blew you away: I should have realised it was coming, given everything that was happening and the way the story unfolded, the trail of breadcrumb clues, …

Book Review: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, Alan Bradley

DETAILS Title: The Sweetness At The Bottom Of The Pie Author: Alan Bradley Publisher: Anchor Canada ISBN: 9780385665834 Genre: Suspense BACK COVER BLURB It is the summer of 1950–and at the once-grand mansion of Buckshaw, young Flavia de Luce, an aspiring chemist with a passion for poison, is intrigued by a series of inexplicable events: A dead bird is found on the doorstep, a postage stamp bizarrely pinned to its beak. Then, hours later, Flavia finds a man lying in the cucumber patch and watches him as he takes his dying breath. For Flavia, who is both appalled and delighted, life begins in earnest when murder comes to Buckshaw. “I wish I could say I was afraid, but I wasn’t. Quite the contrary. This was by far the most interesting thing that had ever happened to me in my entire life. WHAT I THOUGHT The central focus of this novel is the character of Flavia de Luce, the 11 year-old phenom who narrates and carries the entire weight of this suspense-mystery novel. And she does …

First Impressions Friday: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie

It’s that time of week, again, which means, it’s First Impressions Friday. For those of you who are unfamiliar, #FIF is a weekly meme created by J.W. Martin. The goal is to talk about a book you recently started reading then, share your first impressions, predict what you think will happen, and say whether you think you’ll enjoy it. “It is the summer of 1950–and at the once-grand mansion of Buckshaw, young Flavia de Luce, an aspiring chemist with a passion for poison, is intrigued by a series of inexplicable events: A dead bird is found on the doorstep, a postage stamp bizarrely pinned to its beak. Then, hours later, Flavia finds a man lying in the cucumber patch and watches him as he takes his dying breath. For Flavia, who is both appalled and delighted, life begins in earnest when murder comes to Buckshaw. “I wish I could say I was afraid, but I wasn’t. Quite the contrary. This was by far the most interesting thing that had ever happened to me in my …