All posts tagged: The Locksmith’s Daughter

Top 10 All Time Favourites

Shanah over at the Bionic Book Worm has given us an easy task this Tuesday, to list our Top 10 Favourites of All Time. Which, really, when you think about it, is a no-brainer for most of us. And, I’m sure, like me, many are going to have very familiar titles on their lists, that we’ve all seen before. After all, we never really stop telling everyone about our favourite books, now do we? And today will be no exception! So here we go, my top 10 choices from the last few years are: GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny — still my all-time favourite author, and still top on all my lists, but this (book 13 in the series) is outstanding. So well plotted, excellently written, and a culmination of so many threads that it had me yelling out loud at Gamache, “No, don’t … don’t do it!” THE DEFENCE by Steve Cavanagh — my first Steve Cavanagh book that introduced me to one of my all-time favourite characters: Eddie Flynn. This first one is …

Top 5 Books That Need To Be A Movie

The topic of this week’s Top 5 Tuesday from Shanah over at the Bionic Book Worm is, Books That Need To Be A Movie. I know I’ve seen lots of movies and, because of them, have gone on to read the book. But, occasionally, we also read a book that we would love to see up on the silver screen, and even start imagining who we’d like to see play the MCs. I’ve read a few books lately that I think would make great TV shows, especially Steve Cavanagh’s Eddie Flynn series, and, of course, Louise Penny’s Armand Gamache books. Then there’s, Steph Braodribb’s Lori Anderson series, which would also make a great series on the small screen. But books into movies? Hmm … Making my top 5, I would choose: #1. THE RECKONING by James McGee — This is the kind of period drama that the BBC does well. Rabble-rousing fist fights in seedy dark corners of 1813 London. There’s period costume, spies, murder, oh, and did I mention it’s set during the Napoleonic …

Top 10 Books of 2018

Oh dear, given the small number of books I read AND finished this year. I have a very small selection of novels to choose my Top 10 from, especially given half of the books I started to read ended up as DNF. This list could have easily ended up as My Top 5 Books of 2018. But I digress. Looking at the score I gave all the books I did finish and, in reverse order—10 through to 1—with 1 being my favourite book of 2018, here’s what I came up with: #10 A MAN CALLED OVE by Fredrik Backman (8) #9 THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE by Alan Bradley (8.5) #8 A GREAT RECKONING by Louise Penny (8.5) #7 THE DEFENCE by Steve Cavanagh (8.5) #6 DEEP BLUE TROUBLE by Steph Broadribb (8.5) #5 THE BLOODPRINT by Ausma Zehanat Khan (9) #4 THE MISSING INFORMANT by Anders de la Motte (9) #3 FORCE OF NATURE & THE DRY by Jane Hunter (9.5) #2 THE LOCKSMITH’S DAUGHTER by Karen Brooks (9.5) #1 THE …

The Locksmith’s Daughter, by Karen Brooks

DETAILS Title: THE LOCKSMITH’S DAUGHTER Author: Karen Brooks Publisher: William Morrow ISBN: 9780062686572 Genre: Historical Fiction BACK COVER BLURB Mallory Bright is the only daughter of London’s master locksmith. For her there is no lock too elaborate, no secret too well kept. Sir Francis Walsingham, spymaster and protector of Queen Elizabeth—the last of the Tudor monarchs—and her realm, is quick to realise Mallory’s talent and draws her into his world of intrigue, danger and deception. With her by his side, no scheme in England or abroad is safe from discovery; no plot secure. But Mallory’s loyalty wavers when she witnesses the execution of three Jesuit priests, a punishment that doesn’t fit their crime. When Mallory discovers the identity of a Catholic spy and a conspiracy that threatens the kingdom, she has to make a choice – between her country and her heart. Mallory, however, carries her own dark secrets and is about to learn those being kept from her—secrets that could destroy those she loves. Once Sir Francis’s greatest asset, Mallory is fast becoming his …

First Impressions Friday: The Locksmith’s Daughter

It’s that time of week, again, and time for another First Impressions Friday. For those who are unfamiliar, FIF is a weekly meme created by J.W. Martin. The goal is to talk about a book you recently started reading. Share you impressions, predict what you think will happen, say whether you think you’ll enjoy it, etc. “Mallory Bright is the only daughter of London’s master locksmith. For her there is no lock too elaborate, no secret too well kept. Sir Francis Walsingham, spymaster and protector of Queen Elizabeth – the last of the Tudor monarchs – and her realm, is quick to realise Mallory’s talent and draws her into his world of intrigue, danger and deception. With her by his side, no scheme in England or abroad is safe from discovery; no plot secure. But Mallory’s loyalty wavers when she witnesses the execution of three Jesuit priests, a punishment that doesn’t fit their crime. When Mallory discovers the identity of a Catholic spy and a conspiracy that threatens the kingdom, she has to make a choice …