All posts tagged: Glass Houses

Top 10 All Time Favourites

Shanah over at the Bionic Book Worm has given us an easy task this Tuesday, to list our Top 10 Favourites of All Time. Which, really, when you think about it, is a no-brainer for most of us. And, I’m sure, like me, many are going to have very familiar titles on their lists, that we’ve all seen before. After all, we never really stop telling everyone about our favourite books, now do we? And today will be no exception! So here we go, my top 10 choices from the last few years are: GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny — still my all-time favourite author, and still top on all my lists, but this (book 13 in the series) is outstanding. So well plotted, excellently written, and a culmination of so many threads that it had me yelling out loud at Gamache, “No, don’t … don’t do it!” THE DEFENCE by Steve Cavanagh — my first Steve Cavanagh book that introduced me to one of my all-time favourite characters: Eddie Flynn. This first one is …

Top 5 “Unputdownable” Reads!

Yes, yes, I know, it was Tuesday yesterday and I posted my review instead, as Monday was a day off here, and I forgot to post the review on Monday because I thought it was Sunday, and now, here we are, and it’s Wednesday already and I’m thinking where did half the week go? DOH! Anyway, you should all know the drill by now, Top 5 Tuesday is hosted by Shanah over at the Bionic Book Worm, so I’m hoping she’ll forgive my tardy post this week. First up on my list is the easy choice: #1 THE CITY OF BRASS by S. A. Chakraborty — an outstanding debut from someone who will be a go-to author even if she writes her grocery list on the back of a napkin, I am so there. Chakraborty’s world-building is second to none, as are her terrific cast of characters. Dara, Ali and yes, Nahri and the city of Daevabad. I so want to live there, or at the very least, be able to do a Disney visit, …

Top 5 Tuesday: It’s A Mystery

I’ve been waiting for this one to come around all month since Shanah over at the Bionic Book Worm mentioned it. As a reader who loves a good mystery, picking 5 of my top favs to share with you, was difficult. But adding the parameter of “mind blowing” made it a little easier. Here are my choices: #1. GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny — anyone who stops by here regularly knows I’m a huge Louise Penny fan, and love the Three Pines mysteries featuring Chief Superintendent Armand Gamache. GLASS HOUSES was (for me at least) an outstanding read. To quote my own review it was: “Gripping, suspenseful, powerful and, by the end, shocking!” #2. RESURRECTION BAY by Emma Viskic — It’s not often I pick up a debut novel by a new (to me) author, and am totally blown away on just about every level, not just by good writing, but thoroughly absorbing characters. Viskic has crafted a really excellent read that, on the surface, is a familiar one. But then? Adds so many layers …

Top 5 Tuesday: Books Set In Your Own Country

So this weeks’ Top 5 Tuesday is an interesting one. Shanah over at Bionic Book Worm wants us to talk about our top 5 books set in the country where we live. Which, in my case, is Canada. Which means, for me at least, Louise Penny. All her books are set in the fictional village of Three Pines, here, in the province of Québec, which should make it obvious why I picked up the series to begin with. But this isn’t just your average series, this series is something special. From the setting, to the plots, to the over-all character growth from book to book. Louise Penny has crafted a series and characters that are, quite simply, outstanding. Let me stress that while each novel can be read as a standalone, to full appreciate the character growth it’s best to start with book one. It just means you don’t miss out on these continuing arcs and threads seeded in previous books. So, let’s talk favourites here: GLASS HOUSES (book 13) — When a mysterious figure …

Book Review: GLASS HOUSES

DETAILS Title: GLASS HOUSES Author: Louise Penny Publisher: Minotaur Books ISBN: 9781250066190 Genre: Crime | Mystery BACK COVER BLURB When a mysterious figure appears in Three Pines one cold November day, Armand Gamache and the rest of the villagers are at first curious. Then wary. Through rain and sleet, the figure stands unmoving, staring ahead. From the moment its shadow falls over the village, Gamache, now Chief Superintendent of the Sûreté du Québec, suspects the creature has deep roots and a dark purpose. Yet he does nothing. What can he do? Only watch and wait. And hope his mounting fears are not realized. But when the figure vanishes overnight and a body is discovered, it falls to Gamache to discover if a debt has been paid or levied. Months later, on a steamy July day as the trial for the accused begins in Montreal, Chief Superintendent Gamache continues to struggle with actions he set in motion that bitter November, from which there is no going back. More than the accused is on trial. Gamache’s own …