Tag: Chernobyl

Binge-Worthy TV

First we binge-watched the chilling CHERNOBYL, and fought the urge to hide behind the couch cushions as the slo-mo horror of what happened, unfolded in grisly detail.

Then we decided to counterbalance the chills with something (we hoped) would be fun and frivolous, VERSAILLES. And immersed ourselves in the politics and intrigue of Louis XIV court where grown men had better hair and clothes than the woman. Oh my, talk about the French giving their all … I’m sure this one with it’s full-frontal nudity will be severely edited for American viewers. This was such a delicious first outing, we cannot wait for season 2.

Before we started suffering withdrawal, we leapt into something completely different, going from historical drama to, well, Steven Moffat’s modern take on Robert Louis Stevenson’s, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, simply titled JEKYLL. A fantastical reimagining if ever there was one and, if you haven’t seen this one already, may I humble suggest you grab yourself a copy of the 6-part mini series, and frighten yourself into insomnia!

We will watch the last episode tonight. Wish us luck, I think we might need it.

A Cold Day in Hell

There is something to be said about being able to binge-watch a TV series, without interruption or annoying adverts. Unless, of course, you count pausing to pee, eat, and sleep. These past few days has seen us blister our way through HBO’s absolutely chilling CHERNOBYL, which was at once both terrifying in its accurate portrayal of events, as it was compelling in an utterly bleak way.

Neither of us could look away, neither of us wanted to miss a minute, and yet, this is no lighthearted entertainment. It’s brutally honest where it needs to be, offering a number of POVs in which to tell both the human side of this terrible disaster, and the factual side of how events unfolded.

The round up at the end of this heart-wrenching series gives further insight into the character choices, as in Emily Watson’s character of, Ulana Khomyuk, who represented all the scientists involved, and Jared Harris playing Valery Legasov, the professor, brought in to aid cleanup efforts. And Stellan Skarsgard as Boris Shcherbina, the Council of Minsters’ deputy chairman.

All were outstanding performances, in what is, for me at least, some of the most gripping and engrossing fictional drama I’ve watched in a long, long time.