All posts tagged: Books

June 2019 TBR

Ever hopeful that I am, I’m making yet another list of books I hope to read this month. Books that have sat on my coffee table, in the lounge, staring up at me not quite pleading, but almost! Yes, I know, how very whimsical of me. But you know what I mean. I’ve had a weird couple of reading months in which, well, I’ve bombed out. Slump? Ennui? I have no idea. I’m either hitting a brick wall, or the books I’ve picked and read are just not grabbing me, or I’m not in the right head/reading space at the moment. Anyway … hoped for reads in June are: THE KINGDOM OF THE BLIND by Louise Penny — Tried, tested, and always true to her vision. I can count on Penny to deliver me out of my reading slump. AND FIRE CAME DOWN by Emma Viskic — This is the sequel to Resurrection Bay, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Hoping this one woos me too. DESCENDANT OF THE CRANE by Joan He — I had hoped …

Top 5 Tuesday

Because Inge over at The Belgian Reviewer suggested it, I’ve been thinking about book covers and their impact. And more specifically, the one’s that I, personally, love. Certainly, there have been many over the years but, for this Top 5 post, I’m sticking to covers from the last few years rather than the last few decades. #1. THE CITY OF BRASS by S. A. Chakraborty #2. DESCENDANT OF THE CRANE by Joan He as illustrated by Feifei Ruan #3. THE COLOUR OF MAGIC by Terry Pratchett as illustrated by Josh Kirby #4. EARTHSEA by Ursula La Guin as illustrated by Charles Vess #5. The FLAVIA DE LUCE series by Alan Bradley as illustrated by Joe Montgogomery — And yes, I’m nominating the entire 10-book series for their bright colours, fun depictions, and consistent continuity of dark humour. What’s important to note about all these covers—bar the Flavia de Luce series—is they are all fantasy titles. Which begs the question, what’s wrong with all the other genres that they don’t put the same kind of effort …

A Twisted Tale

Having finally received a copy of TWISTED, by Steve Cavanagh, and having managed to avoid any reviews and opinion, I sat down last night to read. I groaned. I fidgeted. And I moaned out loud. So much so that my Other Half asked what was wrong. I rolled my eyes toward the ceiling and said I was bored. B O R E D! Yes, all in CAPS! I managed to read a whole 102 pages before I stuck my bookmark in and gave up, and went to bed muttering. Why? The two main characters of Paul and Maria are not only boring, but unsympathetic on any level. The story, such as it is—given all the hype we’ve had—lead us to believe this was going to be Cavanagh’s “best” book yet. Has, in fact, been a tedious struggle. The prose is flat and the situation these two MCs find themselves in, well, quite frankly, is beyond dull. Reading it is like watching paint peeling off a wall. You keep waiting for something, anything, to happen. It …

Book Review: The Candle And The Flame

DETAILS Title: THE CANDLE AND THE FLAME Author: Nafiza Azad Publisher: Scholastic Press ISBN: 9781338306040 Genre: YA Fantasy BACK COVER BLURB Fatima lives in the city of Noor, a thriving stop along the Silk Road. There the music of myriad languages fills the air, and people of all faiths weave their lives together. However, the city bears scars of its recent past, when the chaotic tribe of Shayateen djinn slaughtered its entire population—except for Fatima and two other humans. Now ruled by a new maharajah, Noor is protected from the Shayateen by the Ifrit, djinn of order and reason, and by their commander, Zulfikar. But when one of the most potent of the Ifrit dies, Fatima is changed in ways she cannot fathom, ways that scare even those who love her. Oud in hand, Fatima is drawn into the intrigues of the maharajah and his sister, the affairs of Zulfikar and the djinn, and the dangers of a magical battlefield. WHAT I THOUGHT Let’s start off by saying that the world-building in THE CANDLE AND …

Friday Fiction

This Friday I want to talk to you about two books that I bought on Wednesday, two new fantasy titles, by two new emerging writers, Joan He and Nafiza Azad. Both of whom are following in the footsteps of other fantasy authors I’ve read recently—S.A. Chakraborty (THE CITY OF BRASS), Ausma Zehanat Khan (THE BLOODPRINT) and Tasha Suri (EMPIRE OF SAND). THE CANDLE AND THE FLAME by Nafiza Azad Hardback, Scholastic 2019 Fatima lives in the city of Noor, a thriving stop along the Silk Road. There the music of myriad languages fills the air, and people of all faiths weave their lives together. However, the city bears scars of its recent past, when the chaotic tribe of Shayateen djinn slaughtered its entire population — except for Fatima and two other humans. Now ruled by a new maharajah, Noor is protected from the Shayateen by the Ifrit, djinn of order and reason, and by their commander, Zulfikar. But when one of the most potent of the Ifrit dies, Fatima is changed in ways she cannot …